A Detailed Look at the All-in-One Homeschool Planning and Recordkeeping Binder

You guys, it’s finally finished! You can’t see it, but I’m over here doing a happy dance because I’m terrible about starting massive projects and never bringing them to completion so I’m pretty proud of this beauty!

I set out to create an All-in-One Homeschool Planning and Recordkeeping Binder last fall around the time my oldest daughter started her kindergarten year at home.

I had fallen in love with the concept of bullet journaling our homeschool years, but the realist in me knew I’d eventually fall behind and never keep up with it AND the perfectionist in me knew I’d much rather have pre-formatted pages that I could simply print out on demand and fill in in 10-15 minutes a day, tops.

To be honest, my time management skills are often lacking. I’d like to blame it on mom brain, but I’ve always been a procrastinator. And if I don’t write it down, there’s a 90% chance I’m going to forget about it.

I’m slowly trying to work on these life skills, ya’ll! I promise! See those habit tracking spreads above? I totally made them as motivation for myself. It’s amazing that filling in a little checkbox each day can help keep me on track, but it’s true! Does it work for you, too?

I’m a person who needs organization in my life, but unfortunately it doesn’t come naturally to me. So I knew I needed a low-pressure planning system that was super simple to keep me organized and on track for the school year.

With the All-in-One Homeschool Planning and Recordkeeping Binder you will be able to:

  • Set your goals weekly
  • Establish a rhythm that works best for your family
  • Prioritize the things that are most important
  • Easily record what gets accomplished every day

Here’s a closer look at the All-in-One Homeschool Planner and Recordkeeping Binder we’ll be using to help streamline and organize our homeschooling and homemaking planning and recordkeeping in the coming years.

For reference, our homeschool is mostly inspired by Maria Montessori and Charlotte Mason with bits of unschooling, gameschooling, and Waldorf here and there. I’m not as familiar with other educational approaches, but I believe this planner is versatile enough to work for everyone!

First up, here’s a list of everything that’s included:

As you can see above, I’ve separated the All-in-One Homeschooling and Recordkeeping Binder into 5 main categories:

  • The Year Ahead: This section comprises the bulk of the planner. It includes Year at a Glance pages for both 2020 and 2021, (12) one-page monthly overviews, (52) weeks’ worth of customizable two-page weekly plans and weekly spreads, and (12) monthly ‘Things to Remember’ pages. I like to think it’s a bullet journal/scrapbook of all things!
  • Home Management: Here you’ll find one-page monthly cleaning checklists, a themed meal planning sheet, a planned purchases list, a password tracker, and an ‘Our Weekly Rhythm’ printable for your home.
  • Curriculum Planning + Recordkeeping: Whether you choose to plan your curriculum by the month or for the entire year all at once these pages will keep you organized and on track. For your convenience, I’ve included a two-page Curriculum Resources overview spread, more than a dozen special studies topics, a field trip planner, and logs to record the books you’ve read, movies you’ve watched, and games you’ve played.
  • Self-Care: This section is all about you! Keep track of your favorite podcasts and books, set goals for yourself and keep on top of them with challenge sheets and a habit tracker, and foster a positive mindset by filling in a monthly gratitude log.
  • Nature Study: Cultivate a love of nature among your children by prioritizing your time spent outdoors and observing and recording the birds, insects, flowers, and plants you encounter each year in Charlotte Mason-inspired Calendar of Firsts tracking sheets. Plus, easily log your outdoors hours using a simple two-page spread.

In-Depth Page Previews

With a 4-page 2020 and 2021 overview along with a sheet to record important dates and 12 one-page monthly overviews, it’s easy to quickly see what events are forthcoming.

  • Record important dates and events on one-page monthly overviews. A four-page annual overview for the years 2020 and 2021 is also included for your reference.
  • Jot down memorable moments in the “Things to Remember” page included at the end of each monthly spread. You’ll be able to easily revisit them whenever you’re feeling nostalgic.

Two-page weekly work plans are included for your scheduling convenience. You can choose between work plans for up to 2 children or up to 6 children (as shown above).

  • Record family lessons and current read-alouds for the week ahead.
  • Write down any field trips, activities, or special events planned for the week.
  • Track each of your children’s individual lesson plans using a BUJO-inspired key to quickly record when tasks have been started, completed, cancelled, or migrated.

Streamlined two-page weekly spreads encourage you to do the following:

  • Write down the week’s meal plan.
  • Designate the top 3 priorities every day.
  • List the daily enrichment activities that are important for your family.
  • Jot down any projects and lessons your children are working on throughout the week under the Tasks section.
  • Maintain an easy attendance record by simply recording the current school day number in the small wreath at the bottom of each day.

Make keeping up with household tasks a breeze by utilizing the following sheets to create a system that works for your family:

  • Use theme nights to create a seasonal meal planning sheet. Record up to 6 meals for each theme and then simply rotate through them. Add in a few extra meals for special occasions or for those times when you’d like something different. Better yet, let the kids pick a few special recipes to try.
  • A one-page monthly cleaning checklist allows you to quickly see what household tasks take priority every week. You can establish a couple home blessing hours each week to give extra attention to the focus areas on the list.

Amidst the homeschooling, homemaking, and general day-to-day obligations you face, it’s hard to remember to make time for yourself.

  • Work on cultivating good habits using an annual spread. Whether it’s exercise, mindfulness, reading a just-for-you book, drinking enough water, or simply getting up before your kids, you’re able to customize the habit tracker to meet your unique needs.
  • For extra fun, engage in a few 100-day or 52-week challenges throughout the year as well!

There’s no need to stress about remembering which resources you’ve planned and used during each school year.

  • Use a two-page spread to keep a written record of the curriculum resources you’re using for each child for the school year. Once you’ve completed the school year, use a color-coded rating system so you’ll know which resources are worth circling back to for your younger children or for more in-depth exploration another year.

Whether you call them unit studies, special topics, or enrichment subjects, these planning sheets make it a breeze to plan them by the month.

  • Use the Special Studies sheet to jot down possible resources, activities, and field trips that correspond to your enrichment subjects.
  • Keep forgetting which artist you’re supposed to be studying next month or which hymn your family is learning? Plan up to 12 months in advance for more than a dozen enrichment subjects so you can easily incorporate them into your homeschooling days.

Make getting outdoors with your children a priority with this easy-to-use outdoors log. It’s designed to be used alongside the 1000 Hours Outside Challenge that you can read more about here.

  • Use a color-coding system to track how many hours are spent outside in various weather conditions. Track the hours spent in various weather conditions and/or temperatures. At the end of the year use the data to create bar graphs and calculate percentages to extend the learning opportunities.

I love Charlotte Mason’s emphasis on nature study. Her ‘Calendar of Firsts’ seems like such an easy way to incorporate nature study into your normal, daily routine.

  • Print a ‘Calendar of Firsts’ for each of your children and then quickly sketch any new plants, birds, flowers, or insects you encounter for the first time each year. If you or your children prefer painting, simply cut watercolor paper to size and print on that instead.
  • Keep an annual written log detailing the date, common name, scientific name, and the location where each new nature discovery was found.

If you have any more questions about how to use or set up the All-in-One Homeschool Planning and Recordkeeping Binder, please don’t hesitate contact me at any time.


Interested in more planning and organization posts?

I’ll be releasing a series of posts related to curriculum planning and home organization over the next few months so be sure to sign up for the newsletter below so you’ll be the first to receive the details.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

shares